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In April 2020, the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child issued a statement warning of the grave physical, emotional and psychological effects of the pandemic on children. The statement included 11 recommendations on how governments can protect children's human rights during the crisis. These included recommendations about online learning, healthcare, child protection services, participation in decision-making and provision of child-friendly information.

Together is collating briefings from across our membership to track the impact of coronavirus on children and their families. We are mapping these against the UN Committee's 11 recommendations to assess the extent to which these are being met in Scotland and what more needs to happen. You can browse the current information under the relevant headings below.

This page is regularly updated. Is there something you think we should add? If so, please complete this form.

Recommendation 1 - limiting restrictions on children's rights

The UN Committee called on governments to consider children's rights and ensure any restrictions are necessary, proportionate and kept to an absolute minimum. The Committee also recommended that governments should use child rights-based budgeting. 

Recommendation 2 - right to rest, leisure, play, cultural life and the arts

The UN Committee recommended that governments explore alternative solutions to ensure children can access their rights to rest, leisure, recreation, cultural and artistic activities while respecting social distancing guidelines.

Recommendation 3 - online learning

The UN Committee said governments must ensure online learning doesn't exacerbate existing inequalities or replace student-teacher interaction. Alternative solutions must be available for children with limited access to the internet or support.

Recommendation 4 - access to food

The UN Committee said governments must ensure children have access to nutritious food, particularly those who are eligible for free school meals.

  • Scottish Poverty and Inequality Research Unit at Glasgow Caledonian University research (June 2020)

    A survey of frontline Scottish community organisations in mid-late May 2020, found that there have been improvements in emergency food aid provision since the start of lockdown. However, it also highlighted a sense of emerging concern amongst community organisations that the food insecurity crisis is far from over.

    Community organisations report demand for food is increasing and believe it is likely to continue to rise. 

    • 65% of frontline organisations report demand for emergency food has risen over the past month, with 73% of organisations anticipating a further rise in demand
    • 80% are concerned they are not reaching everyone in need of emergency food support
    • 33% of organisations expect the amount of emergency food aid funding to reduce
    • Nearly one-in-five organisations (18%) reported that staff wellbeing is worsening
    • Most organisations are providing three or more forms of non-food-based support, including financial support (77%) and befriending and/or check-up calls (70%)

    Read the research here.

     

  • Who Cares? Scotland, report (19th May 2020)

    Who Cares? Scotland published a second report in May 2020, building on its April report.

    The second report also uses real-life case studies and composite stories to highlight the issues care experienced young people are facing. These have been gathered through Who Cares? Scotland's advocacy work and calls to its helpline. 

    The case studies highlight issues such as poverty and the impact this has had on families ability to buy food.

    Read the report here.

  • Aberlour response to Education & Skills Committee (May 2020)

    Aberlour's response to the Scottish Parliament’s Education and Skills Committee Inquiry covers areas in which Aberlour are seeing a profound impact of Covid-19 on families and children. 

    The areas covered in the inquiry response include: 

    • The demand for food packages, the challenges faced by families to store and cook fresh food. 
    • Reduced access to support services and the emotional challenges caused this disruption on disabled children.
    • Inconstancy of access to school hubs. 
    • Child protection concerns for looked after children.
    • Digital exclusion
    • Child poverty

    Read the inquiry response here. 

  • One Parent Families Scotland, briefing (May 2020)

    One Parent Families Scotland outline the key concerns they are seeing from many single parents across Scotland. One of which is their lack of access to food. 

    Read more about this here. 

  • Children 1st, response to Education and Skills Committee (6th May 2020)

    The response considers vulnerable children's access to education during the crisis, including uptake of the places at school hubs to which they are entitled.

    It highlights issues relating to free school meals, including that some families don't know how to access the alternative provision put in place. 

  • One Parent Families Scotland, response to COVID-19 (April 2020)

    School and nursery closures have put many single parents under immense pressure and pushed some into poverty.

    The statement highlights a range of concerns and related recommendations, including that families eligible for free school meals should receive cash payments rather than vouchers or complex packed-lunch distribution schemes. 

  • Aberlour, report (April 2020)

    This report outlines how Aberlour is supporting children, young people and families during COVID-19, including through provision of food parcels and financial support.

  • The Food Foundation, preliminary report (April 2020)

    This report explores why COVID-19 has exacerbated food insecurity across the UK following findings that three million Britons were going hungry just three weeks post lockdown.

  • Children and Young People's Commissioner Scotland, joint letter to supermarkets (29th April 2020)

    Following reports that parents were facing criticism by members of the public and supermarket staff, the Commissioner's Office and partners wrote to supermarket Chief Executives urging them to provide guidance and training to staff on the reasons why parents might need to bring their children shopping.

    • Read the letter in full here. 
  • Poverty Alliance, briefing (22nd April 2020)

    This briefing outlines the immediate impacts of COVID-19 on individuals and families on low incomes, key policy priorities and longer-term concerns. It includes discussion of food insecurity and free school meals, highlighting the inconsistent approach local authorities have taken to alternative provision of free school meals. 

    • Read the full briefing here. 
  • The Food Foundation, article (March 2020)

    This article highlights the impacts of COVID-19 on how we get food and food availability. 

    • Read the article here. 
  • Children and Young People’s Commissioner Scotland, briefing for MSPs (31st March 2020)

    A briefing prepared for MSPs considering the legislative consent memorandum in relation to the UK's Coronavirus Bill 2020. The Bill later became the UK Coronavirus Act 2020. 

    The Commissioner's briefing considers a range of issues including provisions of the UK Bill which remove the obligation on education authorities to provide free school meals to those entitled to them.

  • Engender, briefing (26th March 2020)

    This briefing explores some of the ways in which the differences between men’s and women’s lives play in to COVID-19. It highlights earlier research that women tend to do more household budgeting and management than men and that women typically act as ‘poverty managers’, going without food and other vital resources so that other family members do not.

    The briefing describes critical issues that Scottish Government and parliamentarians should consider when responding to the crisis.

    • Read the full briefing here.
  • Child Poverty Action Group, briefing (25th March 2020)

    This briefing outlines key priorities to support families during the COVID-19 pandemic. It recommends that a direct cash payment would best support families eligible for free school meals rather than voucher schemes which are less flexible. 

    • Read the briefing in full here.
  • Young Minds, blog (24th March 2020)

    Author and mental health campaigner Hope Virgo shares her advice for coping with an eating disorder during the crisis. It discusses the impact that seeing empty supermarket shelves and frenzied customers can have, and strategies for coping.

    • Discover her advice here.

Recommendation 5 - basic services

The UN Committee said governments must maintain provision of basic services for children including healthcare, mental health support, water, sanitation and birth registration.

Recommendation 6 - child protection

The UN Committee said governments must ensure child protection services remain functioning and available, and that they strengthen reporting and referral systems, as well as awareness activities.

Child protection, support and services:

  • Scottish Government report on VAWG (June 2020)

    This is qualitative evidence on the impact of COVID-19 restrictions on people experiencing domestic abuse and other forms of violence against women and girls during March to May 2020.

    The research took place over the initial eight weeks of the COVID-19 'lockdown' and involved semi-structured telephone interviews with Scottish statutory and both semi-structured telephone interviews and documentary evidence provided by third sector organisations involved in supporting people experiencing or perpetrating domestic abuse or other forms of violence against women and girls (VAWG). It also included written qualitative empirical examples provided by members of Police Scotland's Domestic Abuse Champions' network.

    Read the research in full here. 

  • CYCJ, ‘Spend time with me’: Children and young people’s experiences of COVID-19 and the justice system (June 2020)

    This work gathered the views of children and young people who are currently in contact with youth justice services or with previous experience of the youth justice system on COVID-19, and of practitioners working within the youth justice system. 

    The findings show the biggest issues facing children and young people in the justice system are isolation and lack of contact with others. Boredom, lack of activity and being stuck at home were also reported to be significant issues in complying with restrictions.

    However, almost all children and young people reported saying they have been able to stay in touch with family and friends, and practitioners have developed creative methods to sustain contact, and continue to support children, young people and their families.

    • Read the report here
  • Aberlour response to Education & Skills Committee (May 2020)

    Aberlour's response to the Scottish Parliament’s Education and Skills Committee Inquiry covers areas in which Aberlour are seeing a profound impact of Covid-19 on families and children. 

    The areas covered in the inquiry response include: 

    • The demand for food packages, the challenges faced by families to store and cook fresh food. 
    • Reduced access to support services and the emotional challenges caused this disruption on disabled children.
    • Inconstancy of access to school hubs. 
    • Child protection concerns for looked after children.
    • Digital exclusion
    • Child poverty

    Read the inquiry response here. 

  • Who Cares? Scotland, report (19th May 2020)

    Who Cares? Scotland published a second report in May 2020, building on its April report.

    The second report also uses real-life case studies and composite stories to highlight the issues care experienced young people are facing. These have been gathered through Who Cares? Scotland's advocacy work and calls to its helpline. 

    The case studies highlight issues such as:

    • Poverty: destitution and material deprivation, access to social security, new and increased debts
    • Health and wellbeing: social isolation, bereavement, relationship impact
    • Information and participation: education and equipment, the impact of digital participation
    • Provision of care: placement changes, contact with friends and family, rise in anxiety
    • Support: the changing nature of professional support, educational support.

    Read the report here.

  • Scottish Government’s Children and Families Analysis Unit report (June 2020)

    Scottish Government’s Children and Families Analysis Unit has published a briefing paper drawing on research exploring the social and emotional impact of COVID-19 on children and families.

    Read the report in full research here.

  • Children 1st, response to Education & Skills Committee (6th May 2020)

    The response discusses the pressure lockdown has and the impact this has on stress, relationships and coping mechanisms. It also outlines the challenges organisations face to identify child protection concerns when children are less visible.  

  • Child Poverty Action Group, 'Mind the Gap' report (16th April 2020)

    This report highlights some of the gaps in support that exist for children and families affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. Evidence of these gaps is drawn from Child Poverty Action Group's Early Warning System which collects case studies from frontline practitioners working directly with families on the problems they are seeing with the social security system.

  • Who Cares? Scotland, report (9th April 2020)

    The report gives an overview of how COVID-19 and associated measures have impacted care experienced people in contact with Who Cares? Scotland, informed by calls to the organisation's helpline. It covers a wide range of issues, including the impact of the reduction of available family support services. 

  • One Parent Families Scotland, response to COVID-19 (April 2020)

    This statement outlines the worries single parents have during this pandemic. Covering issues such as their concerns about food, how to access help, their child's social development, mental health and education. 

  • Aberlour, 'Responding to COVID-19' report (April 2020)

    The report highlights the increased demand of Aberlour's services, supporting thousands of families across Scotland, providing help and support in response to: 

    • childhood adversity 
    • poverty, unemployment and low-incomes 
    • poor mental health 
    • substance misuse 
    • domestic abuse 
    • parental disability/learning difficulties 
    • poor educational attainment

    Read 'Responding to COVID-19: Supporting Children, Young People & Families at Aberlour' here.

  • Children and Young People’s Commissioner Scotland, briefing for MSPs (31st March 2020)

    briefing prepared for MSPs considering the legislative consent memorandum in relation to the UK's Coronavirus Bill 2020. The Bill later became the Coronavirus Act 2020. 

    The Commissioner's briefing considers a range of issues including provisions of the UK Bill relating to child protection and safeguarding.

  • Scottish Women's Aid, Statement on COVID-19 (19th March 2020)

    This briefing outlines key concerns for women and children who experience domestic abuse and how lockdown may impact their safety and wellbeing. 

    • Read the full briefing here.

Housing and overcrowding:

Mental health services:

  • Who Carers? Scotland, report (19th May 2020)

    Who Cares? Scotland published a second report in May 2020, building on its April report.

    The second report also uses real-life case studies and composite stories to highlight the issues care experienced young people are facing. These have been gathered through Who Cares? Scotland's advocacy work and calls to its helpline. 

    The case studies highlight the impact of lockdown measures on the health and wellbeing of care experienced young people and the psychiatric support they can access. 

    Read the report here.

  • Children 1st, Response to Education & Skills Committee (6th May 2020)

    The response considers how vulnerable children are being affected by the pandemic.

    It highlights the emotional and psychological impact of lockdown on children and their parents. Children 1st reports it has had an increase in calls to Parentline about children finding it hard being stuck inside. Many of the calls are from parents and carers worried about children who are exhibiting distressed behaviour and who need some extra help. 

    • Read the response here.
  • One Parent Families Scotland, briefing (May 2020)

    One Parent Families Scotland outline the key concerns they are seeing from many single parents across Scotland. Some of the key themes are:

    • Increase stresses on family relationships 
    • Access to healthcare and essential items such as prescriptions 
    • Stress, anxiety and mental health
    • Loneliness, social isolation and essential services

    Read more about this here. 

  • One Parent Families Scotland, response to COVID-19 (April 2020)

    The statement highlights the increased stress and anxiety the pandemic is causing for single parents, in turn impacting on their relationship with their children. It notes the particular impact on parents/carers with existing mental health issues. 

  • Who Cares? Scotland Report (9th April 2020)

    The report gives an overview of how COVID-19 and associated measures have impacted care experienced people, informed by calls to the organisation's helpline and advocacy work. It covers a wide range of issues, including the impact of lockdown measures on mental health. 

  • Scottish Human Rights Commission, briefing (30th March 2020)

    An analysis of the human rights implications of the UK Coronavirus Act 2020. It sets out particular concerns in relation to provisions affecting mental health care and treatment. 

  • Engender briefing (26th March 2020)

    The briefing explores some of the ways in which the differences between men’s and women’s lives play in to COVID-19, and describes critical issues that Scottish Government and parliamentarians should include in their thinking about crisis response, mitigation programmes and spending. This includes discussion of mental health impacts. 

    • Read the full briefing here.
  • Scottish Women's Aid, statement on COVID-19 (19th March 2020)

    This briefing outlines key concerns for women and children who experience or have experienced domestic abuse, and the impact self-isolation and social distancing can have on their mental health.

    • Read the full briefing here.

Recommendation 7 - vulnerable children 

The UN Committee recognised that certain children are particularly at risk on account of pre-existing vulnerabilities - it says governments must take targeted measures to protect them. Examples given include disabled children, children living in poverty, refugee and asylum-seeking children and children with underlying health problems.

Children experiencing poverty:

  • Joseph Rowntree Foundation and Save the Children polling results (June 2020)

    A poll of 3,000 families with children claiming Universal Credit or Child Tax Credit shows their experience of COVID-19.

    • The crisis has caused seven in 10 of these families to cut back on essentials including food, utilities, nappies and activities for children such as books and toys, with around 50% cutting back on food. Families from BAME backgrounds have been hardest hit with 86% of BAME respondents reported to have cut back on at least one of these essentials, compared to 69% of white respondents. Additionally, 65% of BAME respondents were reported to be behind with at least one of the following: council tax payments, rent or mortgage, or other bills, compared with 48% of white respondents. Debt is also a more common experience for BAME respondents, with 74% stating that they have had to resort to borrowing compared with 57% of white respondents.
    • The seismic shock of COVID-19, has made it difficult for families to manage their tight budgets, leaving 6 in 10 families having to borrow money and five in 10 families being behind on rent or other essential bills.
    • 65% said their mental health has been affected by concerns about money, with around a quarter reporting a severe impact.
    • Almost six in 10 families said they have faced extra food costs because of the complexities of adhering to social distancing with children and the ongoing pressure on supermarket stock. This has left many families having to limit their shopping trips and often finding that there are only more expensive alternatives on the shelves.
    • A total of 41% of families surveyed reported that they had incurred extra costs for heating, electricity and water. Access to adequate heating, electricity and water is imperative for families with children, particularly those living with an illness or disability. For those living with respiratory conditions, warmth provides an important safeguard in terms of managing symptoms which is essential during the COVID-19 crisis.
    • Home-schooling has led to 28% of parents encountering extra costs, such as pens and books, and 23% reported that they had to spend more on internet access.

    Read the poll results in full here. 

  • Who Cares? Scotland, report (19th May 2020)

    Who Cares? Scotland published a second report in May 2020, building on its April report.

    The second report also uses real-life case studies and composite stories to highlight the issues care experienced young people are facing. These have been gathered through Who Cares? Scotland's advocacy work and calls to its helpline. 

    The case studies touch on topics concerning poverty, destitution and material deprivation, access to social security, new and increased debts.

    Read the report here.

  • Aberlour, response to Education & Skills Committee (May 2020)

    Aberlour is seeing thousands more families across Scotland experiencing extreme financial hardship and being pushed into poverty as a result of the pandemic. Families turning to Universal Credit face the delayed first payment, with no income for up to six weeks. Access to food is a particular issue.

  • Children 1st, response to Education & Skills Committee (6th May 2020)

    The response reports that some families don't know how to access the alternative provision in lieu of free school meals. Others are struggling to navigate their finances or apply for Universal Credit due to lack of technology or data. Children 1st says it is providing support through its different funds and supports calls for direct cash payment for families.

  • Poverty Alliance briefing (22nd April 2020)

    The briefing highlights that an increasing number of families are facing an income crisis. Unprecedented numbers have applied for Universal Credit and organisations providing cash grants to families have seen a significant increase in demand. The briefing also discusses access to food, including for families eligible for free school meals, and highlights the varying approaches that local authorities have taken to alternative provision. 

  • Aberlour, 'Responding to COVID-19' (April 2020)

    The report highlights the strain families are under, with some struggling to put food on the table, pay energy bills or meet basic needs for their children. Aberlour reports that applications to its Urgent Assistance Fund have increased by more than 1400%.

  • Child Poverty Action Group, 'Supporting families during the COVID-19 pandemic' (25th March 2020)

    Briefing outlines the additional financial pressures being placed on already struggling families and makes a range of recommendations, including a £10 increase in child benefit, removal of the benefit cap and two-child limit.

  • Improvement Service paper (no date)

    Improvement Service has developed a short paper considering the impact of COVID-19 on child poverty and how local authorities and health boards can use Local Child Poverty Action Reports to address the challenges that lie ahead.

    Read the paper here.

Children with disabilities and additional support needs:

​Asylum-seeking, refugee and migrant children:

Black and minority ethnic (BAME) children:

Children deprived of their liberty:

  • Justice Committee's letter to Scottish Government and Scottish Prisons Service (June 2020)

    In a letter to Humza Yousaf MSP, Cabinet Secretary for Justice, and Teresa Medhurst, Acting Chief Executive of Scottish Prisons Service (SPS), the Justice Committee sought the views of issues raised in letters received from Scottish Human Rights Commission and Children and Young People's Commissioner Scotland. The issues highlighted in these letters concerned the human rights and wellbeing of prisoners, conditions in prisons and Young Offenders Institutions, family contact, access to mobile phones and a lack of data. These letters aimed to ensure the rights of persons deprived of their liberty are respected and protected during the COVID-19 pandemic, and measures have been implemented in accordance with Scotland’s human rights obligations.

    Read the letter here

  • Children and Young People’s Commissioner Scotland briefing for MSPs (31st March 2020)

    A briefing for MSPs considering the legislative consent memorandum in relation to the UK's Coronavirus Bill 2020. The Bill later became the UK Coronavirus Act 2020. 

    The Commissioner's briefing considers a range of issues including the impact on children deprived of their liberty.

  • Inter-Agency Standing Committee, Interim Guidance (March 2020)

    The report looks at the impact on people deprived of their liberty, including children in detention settings (both immigration and justice). It highlights that the best interests of the child should be the primary consideration in decision-making and that detention of children should be used only as a measure of last resort.

    It notes the increased risk of transmission in closed and restricted settings and highlights that early release and non-custodial alternatives to detention should be used. Where children are released early these must be coordination with child protection actors to ensure adequate care arrangements. 

Care experienced children:

  • CELCIS submission to Scottish Parliament Equalities and Human Rights Committee Inquiry (June 2020)

    This submission explores the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on equalities and human rights. It touches upon the following; poverty and vulnerability, family support and care, foster care, kinship care, children's voice, children with additional support needs, and care leavers.

    Read the submission here. 

     

  • Who Cares? Scotland, report (19th May 2020)

    Who Cares? Scotland published a second report in May 2020, building on its April report.

    The second report also uses real-life case studies and composite stories to highlight the issues care experienced young people are facing. These have been gathered through Who Cares? Scotland's advocacy work and calls to its helpline. 

    Issues highlighted through case studies include:

    • Poverty: destitution and material deprivation, access to social security, new and increased debts
    • Health and wellbeing: social isolation, bereavement, relationship impact
    • Information and participation: education and equipment, the impact of digital participation
    • Provision of care: placement changes, contact with friends and family, rise in anxiety
    • Support: the changing nature of professional support, educational support.

    Read the full report here.

  • Who Cares? Scotland, response to Education & Skills Committee (14th May 2020)

    The response highlights issues such as digital exclusion, access to school places for vulnerable children, mental health, poverty and provision of care, and makes a range of related recommendations. 

  • Aberlour response to Education & Skills Committee (May 2020)

    Aberlour's response to the Scottish Parliament’s Education and Skills Committee Inquiry covers areas in which Aberlour are seeing a profound impact of Covid-19 on families and children. 

    The response discusses child protection concerns for looked after children.

    Read the inquiry response here. 

  • Who Cares? Scotland, statement (24th March 2020)

    Statement considering the impact of COVID-19 on care experienced children and young people. In particular it notes they are less likely to have family and support networks to rely on if they need to self-isolate, may be in precarious work with no financial safety net, and may be more reliant on state provision which will be under pressure due to the impact of the virus on the workforce.

    The statement also gives an outline of how the organisation has adapted its services and is continuing to provide support. 

  • Who Cares? Scotland, report (9th April 2020)

    A report setting out how COVID-19 and associated measures have impacted care experienced people in contact with Who Cares? Scotland, informed by calls to the organisation's helpline. It covers a wide range of issues including support networks, financial and emotional impact, isolation and the impact of school closures. 

  • Aberlour, 'Responding to COVID-19' report (April 2020)

    Report gives an overview of how Aberlour has responded to the crisis and adapted its services, together with information on how children and families are being impacted. 

    Residential services: staff have adapted their shift patterns into 'cohort' teams which spend between 5 and 7 days living with the children, minimising movement and the risk of spreading infection. Children and young people in the houses have found this to be a positive experience, building stronger relationships through spending time with these staff. However, it has meant staff spending longer away from their own families.

    Fostering services: fostering placements are still able to be made, with assessments and panel meetings carried out online.

    Sustain service: this service supports families whose children are on the edge of care. The service has moved to remote support.  

  • Children and Young People’s Commissioner Scotland briefing for MSPs (31st March 2020)

    A briefing for MSPs considering the legislative consent memorandum in relation to the UK's Coronavirus Bill 2020. The Bill later became the UK Coronavirus Act 2020

    The Commissioner's briefing considers a range of issues including the impact on care experience children and young people.

Children affected by parental imprisonment:

  • Families outside website post (June 2020)

    This article written by Families Outside states that prisoners are locked in cells for 23 and a half hours a day. During the remaining 30 minutes they must attend to everything else that enables them to stay well. This means choosing to prioritise between calling loved ones, cleaning cells, discussing daily meal selections and / or emergent problems / issues with staff or to shower. If choosing to phone home, most of the thirty minutes is spent queuing for the phone. In this hall, the 30 minutes allocated is around 8am. This means that it has also become almost impossible for prisoners to contact their lawyers or loved ones. 

    • Read the article in full here
  • Families Outside website post (14th April 2020)

    This website post outlines why Families Outside welcome the news suggesting that people inside prisons will soon have access to secure mobile phones and tablets to facilitate contact with their families. 

    • Read the website post here.
  • Child's Rights Connect report (April 2020)

    This report explores the impact of COVID-19 on the rights of children of parents who are incarcerated and offers recommendations to ensure the full enjoyment of rights for these children and families. This report covers topics such as:

    • pandemic-related criminalisation
    • measures to reduce prison populations
    • the right to health and hygiene 
    • right to information
    • right to family life
    • right to education
    • right to an adequate standard of living

    Read the report in full here. 

  • International Coalition for Children with Incarcerated Parents survey report (April 2020)

    This survey looks at the impact the COVID-19 pandemic on children with incarcerated parents
    around the globe. Responses were received from 57 people in 14 different countries across 6 continents.

    The results offer a worldwide insight to the following questions:

    • How have visits to prisons / jails changed since the start of the COVID-19 crisis (if at all)?
    • If prisons and jails releasing people early, what are the criteria for this?
    • What specific challenges are children and families facing in your state / country as a result of COVID-19?
    • What support is available for children and families in your area?
    • How is your own, or your organisation’s ability to respond to the needs of the families and children of prisoners at this time?
    • What new innovations have been put in place to support children with incarcerated parents as a result of the pandemic (if any)?
    • Any good practice worth sharing?
    • Any practice that needs to improve? What can we learn from this?

    Read the survey report in full here

Recommendation 8 - children in detention 

The UN Committee says children in detention should be released wherever possible. Where this isn't possible, governments should facilitate regular contact with family members.

Release:

Contact with family:

Recommendation 9 - children who breach government rules

The UN Committee said governments should prevent the arrest or detention of children (under 18s) who breach guidance or rules relating to COVID-19.

Recommendation 10 - child-friendly information 

The UN Committee said governments should ensure that child-friendly, accurate information about COVID-19 is disseminated. This should be available in a range of formats. 

Recommendation 11 - participation in decision-making

The UN Committee said governments should ensure children's views are heard and taken into account in decision-making processes relating to the pandemic.