Progress on Child Poverty (Scotland) Bill welcomed

Category: Child poverty

31st May 2017

The End Child Poverty Coalition has welcomed the publication of the Stage One report on the Scottish Government's Child Poverty (Scotland) Bill.

Published by the Scottish Parliament's Social Security Committee, the report sets out clear markers for strengthening and improving the proposed legislation, including the introduction of interim targets to help progress towards the 2030 goals, and retaining a focus on increasing income for families living in poverty - all of which the Coalition called for in its evidence to the Committee.

A spokesperson for the End Child Poverty Coalition said:

"We welcome the Committee's report and believe the recommendations will strengthen the existing Bill.

"We are especially pleased that the Committee listened to our evidence and our suggested policy areas to focus and strengthen the Scottish Government's Delivery Plans have been recommended by the Committee for inclusion within the Bill."

"Expert scrutiny and oversight is essential in ensuring the Scottish Government and all public bodies will stay on track and make progress in meeting the income targets. The Committee's support for the establishment of a Commission on a statutory footing with a scrutiny duty is particularly welcome.

"We are encouraged by the progress that has already been made and look forward to working with MSPs and the government at Stage Two to bring forward amendments to improve and enhance the Bill."

As part of its evidence to the Committee, the End Child Poverty Coalition called for interim targets, greater detail setting out areas to be covered in the Delivery Plans, the need for a measurement framework to be included in the Bill, and the need for an Independent Scrutiny body, which the Coalition believe could be fulfilled by the Scottish Government's proposed Poverty and Inequality Commission.

 

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