Scottish Government response to UNCRC list of issues for UK

Category: Scotland-specific monitoring and reporting

29th March 2016

The UK's UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) compliance will be examined formally at an oral session on 23 and 24 May 2016. The full Scottish Government response to the UNCRC List of Issues, setting out the actions taken in Scotland to protect and promote children's rights in the areas identified by the UNCRC has now been published.

The publication sets out the actions taken to protect and promote children's rights in Scotland, including progress made in implementing many of the provisions in the Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014. It also reiterates Scotland's opposition to the proposed repeal of the Human Rights Act by the UK Government.

The response also includes:

- Scotland's opposition to changes being made by the UK Government to the Child Poverty Act 2010, in particular proposals for revised targets which do not take income into account.

- Scotland's commitment to ensuring the wellbeing of children arriving with their families as part of the Syrian Resettlement Programme, which has seen over 400 refugees arrive since 2015.

- An outline of measures to strengthen children's rights in Scotland, including free early learning and childcare expanded to 600 hours per year for 3 and 4 year olds and disadvantaged 2 year olds, free school meals for P1-3, and extended rights to support for young people in care and care leavers.

The full response comes as the Scottish Government launches a consultation on draft guidance to local authorities, health boards and other public bodies relating to duties around children's rights and children's services planning.

Together are the co-ordinating body for Scotland's NGO report to the UN Committee within the reporting cycle. For more information on how Scotland informed the UK's response to the list of issues, visit our news page here.

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